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From Soupy to Nuts! A History of Detroit Television by Tim Kiska

  From Soupy to Nuts! by Tim Kiska
Available from 
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From Soupy to Nuts! A History of Detroit Television by Tim Kiska  - Back in the 1940s – before coaxial cable from the East Coast reached Detroit – television was as local as Vernors, Sanders Hot Fudge and Hudson’s. There was room for clowns, bowlers, philosophers, journalists, adventurers, movie mavens, wrestlers and magicians.

The people who put these shows on were drunks, geniuses, thugs, heroes, artists, craftsmen, hustlers and poets. Some were all of these things at times. A few were all these things before lunch.

As the medium grew, thousands of Detroiters visited Channel 4 to see Milky the Clown, danced on Channel 62’s The Scene or tuned in to watch bombastic anchorman Bill Bonds. With the evaporation of distinct local television, a piece of Detroit’s character disappeared.

From Soupy to Nuts! is a snapshot of Detroit TV history – from Sonny Eliot, Bozo the Clown, Bill Kennedy, Lou Gordon and Gil Maddox to Al Ackerman, Sir Graves Ghastly, Dick the Bruiser and Mr. Belvedere.

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Amazon.com
From Soupy to Nuts! A History of Detroit Television by Tim Kiska

From Soupy to Nuts! by Tim KiskaBack in the 1940s – before coaxial cable from the East Coast reached Detroit – television was as local as Vernors, Sanders Hot Fudge and Hudson’s. There was room for clowns, bowlers, philosophers, journalists, adventurers, movie mavens, wrestlers and magicians.

The people who put these shows on were drunks, geniuses, thugs, heroes, artists, craftsmen, hustlers and poets. Some were all of these things at times. A few were all these things before lunch.

A Newscast for the Masses: The History of Detroit Television Journalism by Tim Kiska

A Newscast for the MassesAs the chief source of information for many people and a key revenue stream for the country's broadcast conglomerates, local television news has grown from a curiosity into a powerful journalistic and cultural force. In A Newscast for the Masses, Tim Kiska examines the evolution of television news in Detroit, from its beginnings in the late 1940s, when television was considered a "wild young medium," to the early 1980s, when cable television permanently altered the broadcast landscape. Kiska shows how the local news, which was initially considered a poor substitute for respectable print journalism, became the cornerstone of television programming and the public's preferred news source. 

Detroit Television by Tim Kiska [Paperback]

Detroit TelevisionDetroit broadcasting history is rich with character . . . and characters. It began atop the Penobscot Building on October 23, 1946, when WWDT shot a signal to the convention center, part of a "New Postwar Products Exposition." WWJ-TV offered scheduled programming in June 1947, and WXYZ-TV and WJBK-TV jumped in a year later. The medium has influenced the city's personality and social agenda ever since. Soupy Sales turned getting a pie in the face into an art form. Mort Neff celebrated the state's outdoor charms. George Pierrot showed Detroiters the world. Other beloved personalities include: Milky the Clown, Ed McKenzie, Sonny Eliot, John Kelly, Marilyn Turner, Robin Seymour, Bill Bonds, Dick Westerkamp, Jingles, Bill Kennedy, Lou Gordon, Captain Jolly, Johnny Ginger, Auntie Dee, and many more.

Detroit Television [Images of America] by Tim Kiska

Detroit Television by Tim KiskaDetroit Television - Detroit broadcasting history is rich with character . . . and characters. It began atop the Penobscot Building on October 23, 1946, when WWDT shot a signal to the convention center, part of a "New Postwar Products Exposition." WWJ-TV offered scheduled programming in June 1947, and WXYZ-TV and WJBK-TV jumped in a year later. The medium has influenced the city's personality and social agenda ever since. Soupy Sales turned getting a pie in the face into an art form. Mort Neff celebrated the state's outdoor charms. George Pierrot showed Detroiters the world. Other beloved personalities include: Milky the Clown, Ed McKenzie, Sonny Eliot, John Kelly, Marilyn Turner, Robin Seymour, Bill Bonds, Dick Westerkamp, Jingles, Bill Kennedy, Lou Gordon, Captain Jolly, Johnny Ginger, Auntie Dee, and many more.

 

 

 

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